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Article
January 8, 1916

THE INCIDENCE OF SYPHILIS AMONG JUVENILE DELINQUENTS: ITS RELATION TO MENTAL STATUS

Author Affiliations

COLUMBUS, OHIO

From the Bureau of Juvenile Research, Columbus, Ohio.

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(2):102-105. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580280032012

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Abstract

The Wassermann tests of serum obtained from the Boys' Industrial School and the Girls' Industrial Home, in Ohio, herein reported, were made by Dr. Walter McKay, assistant physician of the Institution for the Feeble Minded, Columbus, Ohio, and the specimens of blood were collected by Dr. Walter A. Noble of the Bureau of Juvenile Research. Dr. Noble also made the physical examinations reported. To the careful work of these gentlemen is due the credit for the work here presented. The technic of the Wassermann tests, as executed by Dr. McKay, is that "described and recommended by Captain Charles F. Craig, of the U. S. Army Medical Corps, Bulletin 3, published by the surgeon general," with one change. Dr. McKay used sheep's blood amboceptor and corpuscles. His method of reading the reaction is the one outlined by Dr. W. T. Mefford of the Wassermann Laboratory, Chicago, calling the strongest positive reaction

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