[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.173.48.53. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 28, 1911

COUGH DURING AUSCULTATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS: A PLEA FOR ITS ROUTINE EMPLOYMENT TO ELICIT FINE RÂLES:—TECHNIC AND CONVENIENT SIGNAL

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service FORT STANTON, N. MEX.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(4):245. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560040013004

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis by the average clinician depends quite frequently on the finding of fine râles. There are earlier physical signs, but in the absence of bacilli none is of so much significance.

The râles most important in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis are not heard during ordinary respiration. A light cough at the end of expiration may reveal, during the inspiration following, fine adventitious sounds, indicating a lesion, before the Röntgen rays will cast a shadow of it, long before the percussion note is impaired, and frequently before the normal respiratory murmur is modified. This simple expedient is described in most text-books on physical diagnosis and is resorted to by all expert clinicians. Its omission is even noticed at once by an experienced patient. But it is believed that the average busy doctor sometimes neglects it. The following description of the technic employed for several years by officers

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×