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Article
February 4, 1911

THE REMOVAL OF SEWING-NEEDLES FROM SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUES

Author Affiliations

BISMARCK, N. D.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(5):344-345. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560050030009

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Abstract

The removal of a sewing-needle, or other similar sharp-pointed foreign body, from the soft subcutaneous tissues becomes, at times, a more complicated procedure than the simple injury would seem to indicate. A local anesthetic is usually injected, and an incision made through the punctured wound with the hope of seeing or feeling the broken end of the needle in the bottom of the incision. Often one is surprised at the difficulty encountered in the search for the needle. Even after the end of the needle is located with the finger, it is not always readily grasped with a forceps and pulled out.

The broken end of the needle is blunt and rough. In making the incision considerable pressure is brought to bear against this end of the needle, and the sharp point at the other end is pushed still farther ahead, if the tissues in front be easily penetrable. After

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