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Article
January 22, 1916

FILARIA SANGUINIS HOMINIS: WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Second Assistant Physician, Boston City Hospital (Third Medical Service); Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts College Medical School BOSTON

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(4):266-267. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580300034012
Abstract

The Filaria sanguinis hominis (Filaria nocturna, Filaria bancrofti) was first described in 1863, when Demarquay discovered the parasites in chylocele fluid. Later (1866) it was demonstrated in chylous urine by Wucherer. It was not until 1872, however, that its presence in the blood was noted, by Lewis, and in 1876 Bancroft's investigations explained the disappearance of the parasite from the blood during the daytime by its migration to the lungs. Two years later Manson found filariae in mosquitoes. Further work by Manson, Bancroft, Low, and Fülleborn, and also by Grassi and Noé, who inoculated healthy dogs by means of infected mosquitoes, has given us our present knowledge of the life history of the parasites.

In the human host the parasites (mostly females) lodge in the lymphatic system, especially of the scrotum, extremities, cord, epididymis and testicles. The eggs, after leaving the uterus, where they are present in all stages of

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