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Article
March 4, 1911

IMPORTANT RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR KNOWLEDGE OF POLIOMYELITIS

JAMA. 1911;LVI(9):671-672. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560090043016
Abstract

Landsteiner and Popper1 first demonstrated experimentally the infectious nature of poliomyelitis. They showed that the disease could be produced in monkeys by inoculating them with an emulsion of the cord from a child who had died of poliomyelitis. This was soon confirmed by the work of Flexner and Lewis2 who reported that, by using the intracerebral method of inoculation, they were able to transmit the disease to monkeys in series.

Since this pioneer experimental work, much has been added to our knowledge of the experimental disease by workers in this country and in Europe, reference to most of which has been previously made in these pages. Recently there have appeared in The Journal three papers by different workers which may almost be said to be the most important contributions to our knowledge of the disease since the early work above mentioned.

Osgood and Lucas3 show that it

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