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Article
March 11, 1911

FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE: ITS DIAGNOSIS BY TRANSMISSION OF RESPIRATORY SOUNDS

Author Affiliations

Adjunct Assistant Surgeon to Bellevue Hospital; Assistant Attending Surgeon to Lincoln Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1911;LVI(10):740-741. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560100032014
Abstract

In a paper, read before The Society of Practical Medicine in May, 1907, entitled, "Diagnosis of Fracture of the Clavicle by Auscultation of Voice and Breath Sounds," I called attention to the fact that in normal individuals there is distinct transmission of both voice and breath sounds probably from the trachea, outward along the shaft of the clavicle to its outer extremity.

When a small-belled stethoscope is accurately applied to the outer extremity of the clavicle, breath sounds and voice sounds of a distinctly bronchial or tracheal quality are to be heard.

In a series of over 300 normal persons thus tested, it appeared that the whispered voice was the most reliable test and that in over 95 per cent, of all the cases a more or less intensely bronchial whisper could be heard over the acromial end of the clavicle.

In over two-thirds of the cases the spoken voice

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