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Article
March 18, 1911

THE AUTOLYSIS OF THE CRYSTALLINE LENS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

JAMA. 1911;LVI(11):807-809. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560110029012
Abstract

In the study of traumatic cataract and the needling operation, I was struck with the very scant description of the manner in which the lens becomes opaque and the causes for its opacity and final absorption.

Parsons1 states that after exposure of the lens fibers to the action of the aqueous they swell up, become opaque, protrude through the capsular wound, and finally break up in the usual manner, absorption being largely due to the leukocytes, which become swollen and filled with granules.

Schlösser2 (1887) in an article on traumatic cataract, and Schirmer3 (1889) have studied the microscopic changes very thoroughly, but without throwing much light on the cause of these changes.

Fuchs4 states that the fibers swell up and become opaque through absorption of water; some are broken off and drop into the anterior chamber and are absorbed. But he also says that concussion without

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