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Article
March 18, 1916

FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON THE CAUSE OF RAT-BITE FEVER

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(12):894-895. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580380044021
Abstract

In a review of the various alleged etiologic factors in relation to rat-bite fever, or sokodu, which has long been recognized in Japan as a definite febrile disease, it was remarked in a recent number of The Journal1 that new cases will undoubtedly soon be brought to light in greater number. This is the familiar consequence of the publicity of education. It was also pointed out that renewed study of the disease, when fresh opportunities are discovered, would be likely to settle the debated question as to whether the causative agent is a spirochete, as some have asserted, or some other form of detrimental organism.

Since our comment on the subject, further contributions have appeared. Investigators2 at the Imperial Japanese Institute for Infectious Diseases, in Tokyo, have identified spirochetes in preparations from two well defined cases. The organism is described as somewhat larger than the Spirochaeta pallida, but

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