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Article
March 25, 1911

THE NAME "EPINEPHRIN" VERSUS THE NAME "ADRENALIN"

JAMA. 1911;LVI(12):901. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560120041021

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Abstract

There are thirty or more different brands of the blood-pressure-raising principle of the suprarenal gland on the market, five being in this country alone. These products are identical so far as their chief constituent is concerned; they differ, however as to the solvent and the preservative used. The processes of manufacture of some of them are patented; all of them are sold under trade names.

Until two years ago there was no common name applicable to this active principle; whenever reference was made to it a trade name had to be used. At that time the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry, realizing the need of a generic term, adopted "epinephrin" as such a term. This name was selected in part because Abel had adopted it in 1899; in part because, so far as could be discovered, it was the name under which, through Abel's publications, the substance first appeared in

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