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Article
April 8, 1911

TRICHINIASIS IN ITALIANS: FOLLOWING THE EATING OF RAW HAM OR "PROSCIUTTO"

JAMA. 1911;LVI(14):1030-1031. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560140016008
Abstract

The Italians give much thought to the preparation of their food, palatability being of prime importance, while care in the selection—especially of animal food—seems to be secondary.

I have seen two cases of trichiniasis among Italians in private practice within the past year; and have collected ten other cases from the records of the Boston City Hospital, admitted within the past five years, six of these ten cases being directly traceable to the ingestion of raw ham. These latter cases were among Italians, and the infection was traced to the same source; that is, smoked ham, or "prosciutto." There was one death among the twelve cases.

This raw ham, or prosciutto, was, up to two or three years ago, imported in fairly large amounts, but the recent advance in the cost of food products has made the importation almost prohibitive. The imported ham, however, may be obtained in about every

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