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Article
April 8, 1911

TREATMENT OF THE PARALYSIS FOLLOWING ACUTE POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Orthopedic Surgeon, Albany Hospital ALBANY, N. Y.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(14):1031-1033. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560140017009
Abstract

The anatomic relation between the motor nerve-cells of the anterior horn and the muscles of the body is very complex. In this connection Lovett and Lucas1 have pointed out that the motor cells are arranged in spindle-shaped bundles or groups, extending frequently through several segments of the spinal cord. Whether each motor nerve-cell group represents an anatomic set of muscles, or a functional grouping, has not been determined, but it is known that one group, or center, will sometimes send impulses to two or more muscles; and, on the other hand, one muscle may receive motor impulses from more than one nerve-cell group. The bearing of these facts on the lesions produced in the cord by poliomyelitis and on the treatment of the paralysis following acute poliomyelitis is most important.

Recent investigation has shown that the virus of acute poliomyelitis causes a profuse inflammation within the spinal cord, the

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