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October 31, 1914

THE RESULTS IN ONE HUNDRED OPERATIONS PERFORMED ON THE DIAGNOSIS OF BRAIN TUMOR

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(18):1530-1533. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570180016003
Abstract

The firm confidence with which the experienced surgeon of the present day approaches the solution of the problems set before him suffers a severe setback when these involve the operative treatment of brain tumors. True, we frequently read of single successful operations, but the infinite measure of our failures becomes apparent only in a few larger statistics. In no other domain of surgery are we so much at the mercy of the treacherous patient. None of us have been spared annoying surprises and numerous disappointments. And yet, when we glance back at what has been achieved at operations performed on the diagnosis of brain tumor, we need not abandon ourselves to too pessimistic a view of our accomplishments. We should always bear in mind that, without operation, the patients progress toward a terrible fate —excruciating headaches, epileptic attacks, paralysis, and chiefly, steadily advancing blindness which renders life no longer worth

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