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Article
April 22, 1916

RESULTS FROM BLOOD TRANSFUSION: IN THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE POSTHEMORRHAGIC ANEMIA AND THE HEMORRHAGIC DISEASES

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(17):1291-1295. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580430009003
Abstract

My active interest in the subject of blood therapy became aroused about two years ago, when I was able to follow closely the course of a patient under the care of Dr. Franklin A. Dorman.

This patient, a primipara, after a tedious but otherwise normal labor, gave birth to an infant weighing 6 pounds, 12 ounces. There was a small perineal tear which was repaired at once. The loss of blood accompanying the delivery was insignificant. For the first week the patient was slightly toxic, the temperature ranging from normal in the morning to about 100.5 F. in the evening; during this time she was flowing very freely. As the temperature persisted and became higher, and the flow increased, Dr. Dorman decided to explore the uterus. This was done on the eleventh day, under light chloroform anesthesia, with negative findings. Hemorrhage was so profuse during the exploration that it became

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