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November 7, 1914

HOSPITAL VENTILATION FROM THE VENTILATING ENGINEER'S POINT OF VIEW

JAMA. 1914;LXIII(19):1628-1631. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02570190012006
Abstract

Inscribed under the statue of Hygeia gracing the entrance of a foreign hospital are words with the following meaning:

One names as the greatest earthly fortune, Health. I contradict; a greater one is Convalescence.

It is difficult to express more forcefully in a few words the noble purpose of the hospital, and the responsibilities of those who are most intimately connected with its management. It also implies to architects and engineers that there can be no building worthy of greater effort than a hospital. One of the important items in the construction and operation of a hospital is that of providing "ventilation" for its various rooms. Ventilation means to supply pure fresh air (from some source, no matter from where) and the removal of vitiated air, both in as simple, positive and inoffensive ways as possible.

There is, of course, no medical man who does not value "pure fresh air,"

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