[Skip to Navigation]
Article
April 29, 1911

THE RELATION OF PREMENSTRUAL FEVER TO PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Montefiore Home Country Sanitarium, Bedford Station, Westchester County, N. Y.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(17):1239-1240. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560170003002
Abstract

In 1861 Fiedler1 drew attention to definite rises in temperature occurring with anomalies in menstruation, particularly dysmenorrhea. He noticed that fever occurred one or more days preceding the menstrual period and disappeared rapidly with the onset of the menses. He called this "menstrual fever" and thought that it was due to an anomaly in menstruation, but not to an inflammatory process. At times since, physiologists have studied the changes occurring in the circulation, temperature and metabolism associated with menstruation; gynecologists have seen an increase in inflammatory pelvic conditions, or a lighting up of those which had been seemingly latent at this time, and finally, internists have noted the influence of menstruation on pulmonary tuberculosis, particularly the aggravation of subjective symptoms and an increase in the physical signs and temperature changes (F. Neuman2). Macht3 has recently published a review and a careful study of the history of the

×