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Article
May 6, 1911

FAMILY PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: THREE FATAL CASES OF PRIMARY ANEMIA (TWO BROTHERS AND ONE SISTER) AND TWO OF SECONDARY ANEMIA (TWO SISTERS) IN MEMBERS OF ONE FAMILY; FATAL PRIMARY ANEMIA IN A PATERNAL COUSIN; A FIFTH CASE OF FATAL PRIMARY ANEMIA IN A PATERNAL UNCLE.

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE, WIS.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(18):1315-1318. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560180009006
Abstract

The title of this paper well defines an interesting series of cases that have come under my personal observation. I have nothing to add to the existing theories of the causation of true pernicious anemia. That the immediate active factor is some hemolysin, is probably uncontradicted, but the mystery of the ultimate cause is still unsolved. William Hunter has emphasized the important rôle played by septic conditions of the mouth and tongue. Grawitz records four cases based on his view of the intestinal origin of the disease. It is further stated (Edwards) that such conditions as "pregnancy and the puerperium, syphilis, poor hygiene, infectious diseases—as typhoid and malaria"—are causative. But the astonishing and absolute increase in the incidence of the disease would seem to warrant a belief that these must be considered rather as bearing an associated than an etiologic relation to primary anemia. On the other hand, intestinal parasitism

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