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Article
July 27, 1889

THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AND ITS RELATIONS TO PUBLIC HEALTH.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1889;XIII(4):122-126. doi:10.1001/jama.1889.04440030014003
Abstract

Although the primary and potent influence that prompted the movement that resulted in the assembling of the Convention of delegates in the city of New York, May, 1846, to effect a permanent National organization of the profession of the United States of America, was the desire to elevate the standard of professional education and thereby increase the usefulness and honor of the profession; yet even that preliminary Convention did not pass without initiating important measures having a direct bearing on the interests of public health.

On the second day of that Convention, May 6, 1846, Dr. John H. Griscom, of New York City, offered the two following resolutions, which were adopted without opposition:

"Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed to consider the expediency, and if deemed expedient, the mode of recommending and urging upon the several State Governments the adoption of measures for a registration of the births,

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