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Article
June 10, 1916

THE FUNCTION OF THE OMENTUM IN PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(24):1858. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580500036014
Abstract

That substances in solution can be absorbed through the direct intermediation of the blood vessels from connective tissue interstices as well as from the larger spaces, such as the pleural and peritoneal cavities, has long been demonstrated beyond a doubt. There was a time when it was assumed with considerable confidence that the drainage from such tissue spaces is essentially a function of the lymphatics arising from them. It shall not be denied that the lymphatic circulation, sometimes even spoken of as the "absorbent system," may take part in this process of absorption. But the process of lymphatic absorption, even when aided by active or passive movements, is a comparatively slow one and will scarcely suffice to explain the rapidity with which a poison in solution can be removed from a tissue space and distributed in the body so as to exert its toxic action after a brief interval. When

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