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June 17, 1916

SOME OF THE LARGER PROBLEMS OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION

Author Affiliations

Surgeon-General, U. S. Public Health Service; President of the American Medical Association WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1916;LXVI(25):1899-1902. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02580510001001
Abstract

The profession of medicine enters into and touches every human activity from the first kindling of the vital flame until life's candle flickers out. The joys of being and the sorrows of life, the travail of labor and the relaxations of idleness, the opulence of riches and the meagerness of poverty have running through their web and woof the fine blue thread of the calling which has as its ideal the physical salvation of mankind. Throughout the nearly seventy years of its existence the American Medical Association has clung with unfaltering fidelity to the doctrine of the prolongation of human life and the relief of the miseries of man. In peace and in war, in prosperity and in public calamity, in crowded city and on isolated frontier, despite all opposition, it has moved steadily forward toward the goal of health, recognizing neither creed nor sect, neither school nor system, but

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