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Article
July 8, 1916

ANGINA EPIGLOTTIDEA ANTERIOR: REPORT OF A CASE CAUSED BY THE BACILLUS INFLUENZAE

Author Affiliations

AUSTIN, TEXAS

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(2):116. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590020032009
Abstract

In spite of the conflicting evidence on the question of whether angina epiglottidea anterior is a separate pathologic process, or only a part of a general involvement of the adjacent structures, it is an undeniable fact that a curious inflammation of the epiglottis in which there is remarkably little involvement of the rest of the throat does occur. Clement F. Theisen,1 in 1900, reported three cases of this disease and was quite positive then that angina epiglottidea anterior, or as he styled it "acute infectious epiglottitis," occurs as a primary affection of the epiglottis. However, this view is disputed by Semon,2 Kyle,3 and others. In 1914, Theisen4 reported another case of this disease and made the statement that added experience with this condition has led Him to believe Semon's views, "that the various forms of acute septic inflammation of the throat and neck, hitherto considered as

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