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Article
September 28, 1889

SOME OF THE GRAVER AND RARER FORMS OF CINCHONISM.Read in the Section of Medicine at the Fortieth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, June 25, 1889.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS, AND OF CLINICAL MEDICINE IN THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND.

JAMA. 1889;XIII(13):433-446. doi:10.1001/jama.1889.02401100001001
Abstract

Although everyone knows that the preparations and alkaloids of cinchona bark occasionally produce very undesirable effects upon the human organism, there seems to be a widespread impression that results of a more serious character are not to be apprehended, and one is accustomed to see these preparations administered with utter recklessness, It is true, the unpleasant results observed are usually the outcome of idiosyncrasy, and are not part of the regular physiological action of cinchona. As ordinarily observed this action cannot be said to be toxic in the sense in which we speak of the toxic action of strychnine, of opium, of arsenic, and the other well-recognized poisons. We regard as exceptional the various cutaneous disorders, the disturbances of the digestive, the respiratory, the circulatory and nervous systems not infrequently observed, and usually hold them to be accidental expressions of the resentment of the economy at the presence of the

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