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Article
October 12, 1889

THE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESISTANCE OF THE PERITONEUM TO INFECTION.

JAMA. 1889;XIII(15):525-526. doi:10.1001/jama.1889.02401110019003
Abstract

In the past year hardly a more interesting series of experiments has been made in the interest of surgical pathology than those of Rinne.1 Practically and clinically it has been demonstrated that the peritoneal cavity under certain unknown circumstances has the power of taking care of a vast amount of filth. It remained for Rinne to harmonize observed clinical facts with a priori deductions.

He found that large quantities of septic material and pure cultures of pyogenic bacteria were absorbed, although injected daily into the peritoneal cavity of animals, provided that the peritoneal surfaces were uninjured. The injections produced only mild symptoms in direct proportion to the quantity of septic material used, and in no case was there more than a moderate rise of temperature. The results were very different when there were coincident defects in the peritoneum, exposing the subperitoneal connective tissue to infection. Then there invariably appeared

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