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Article
February 20, 1915

HAY FEVER: ITS TREATMENT BY INJECTION OF A SOLUTION OF RAGWEED POLLEN

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(8):655-657. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570340027007
Abstract

Hay fever as a clinical entity has been recognized since about the beginning of the nineteenth century. It was first regarded as a catarrh. Bostwick, one of the earliest writers on the subject, connected it with the heat and sun rays and called it summer catarrh. It was a natural transition for the disease to be later called hay fever, as it was thought, at least by lay minds, that the odor of hay caused an attack. Similarly, the appellation "rose cold" was given to that variety which seemed to follow from inhaling odor of roses. The first definite connection between the pollen of plants and hay fever was recognized by John Elliotson, in 1830.

In the United States it was early noticed that there are two distinct conditions inducing hay fever, quite similar in nature, but occurring at different times of the year—one beginning about the last week in

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