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Article
February 27, 1915

CAVERNOUS AND CYSTIC LYMPHANGIOMA OF THE CECUM: WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Visiting Surgeon, City Hospital; Surgeon, Deaconess Hospital ST. LOUIS

From the St. Louis City Hospital.

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(9):719-721. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570350013003
Abstract

If Wegner's position relative to the congenital origin of lymphangioma is correct, it is not at all surprising that my review of the available literature has failed to show the record of a case of lymphangioma of the cecum or colon. With the present-day method of microscopic examination of all tumors removed at operation, surgeons have become appreciative of the importance of the method and the frequency of tumors heretofore regarded as of infrequent occurrence. It is not at all improbable that the future will show that lymphangioma of the large intestine is not so uncommon as the literature now indicates.

Wegner1 classifies lymphangioma into (1) simple, (2) cystic, and (3) cavernous. In our specimen, Professor Welch found both cystic and cavernous forms of lymphangioma.

It is conceded by some writers that inflammatory changes may occur in these growths, and that the latter are detected in a large percentage

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