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Article
December 7, 1889

THE CLINIC.

JAMA. 1889;XIII(23):809-813. doi:10.1001/jama.1889.02401190015003
Abstract

REGULAR SURGICAL CLINIC AT RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, OCTOBER 15, 1889.  BY CHARLES T. PARKES, M.D.,PROFESSOR OF SURGERY.[Reported for The Journal.]

Case 1.  —Mrs. H., Chicago, age 44, American, housewife.

Gentlemen:  —This patient you will recognize as the one upon whom we performed vaginal hysterectomy, three weeks ago, for cervical carcinoma. She is perfectly well and desires to leave the hospital.You will remember that the broad ligaments before division were secured by means of two pair of long-jawed forceps, for the purpose of preventing hæmorrhage, and no ligatures were used; and you will also remember that very little blood was lost at the time of the operation. The operation was finished at 2:30 P.M.; the patient was returned to the hospital and put to bed. She rested very comfortably until about 8 P.M., when she was seized with severe vomiting, and this was followed by profuse hæmorrhage

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