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Article
March 27, 1915

AN ELECTRIC-HEATED WATER-JACKETED INFANT INCUBATOR AND BED: FOR USE IN THE CARE OF PREMATURE AND POORLY NOURISHED INFANTS

Author Affiliations

Chicago Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois, College of Medicine

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(13):1068-1069. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.25710390003011c

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Abstract

To meet the requirements for the safe application of artificial heat to premature and weak infants, three conditions must be observed:

  1. The heat must be of a fairly constant temperature, with a safe maximum.

  2. A constant supply of fresh air must be available.

  3. A normal average of humidity must be maintained.

I have attempted to meet these requirements by the construction of an electric-heated water-jacketed bed.

The bed shown in Figure 1 is constructed of heavy sheet copper with inside measurements as follows: length 30 inches, width 17 inches, and depth 13 inches. The floor and sides are surrounded by a water jacket 1 inch thick. The side walls, furthermore, are covered by a layer of cork one-fourth inch thick, which practically prevents heat radiation from the external surface, limiting heat radiation to the inner surface of the jacket, that is, sides and floor. On the left hand side a

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