[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.175.201.14. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 4, 1916

A FURTHER NOTE ON THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF RETROBULBAR NEURITIS IN EXPANDING LESIONS OF THE FRONTAL LOBES: WITH A REPORT OF THIS SYNDROME IN A CASE OF ANEURYSM OF THE RIGHT INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

Author Affiliations

Neurologist to Bellevue and New York Hospitals NEW YORK

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(19):1361-1363. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590190023008
Abstract

Difficulty in the diagnosis of cerebral lesions varies directly with the degree of physiologic latency possessed by the affected brain area.

Again, even when tissue subserving active function becomes irritated or destroyed by disease, our difficulty in decision as to the part involved depends largely on the degree of objectivity in the phenomena produced.

The vertigo accompanying cysticercus of the fourth ventricle eludes the descriptive powers of the majority of patients, nor are the uncinate fits associated with irritative processes in the hippocampal gyri more easily portrayed: in consequence of the difficulty in describing concretely such subjective states, occurrences of the most precise character are apt to be misinterpreted by even alert observers. In the recognition of disease affecting the frontal lobes there is ample illustration of the truth of these general propositions. These gyri are not only highly latent, but such exiguous symptomatology as has been ascribed to them

×