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Article
November 4, 1916

THE RIGHT AND WRONG OF MAKING EXPERIMENTS ON HUMAN BEINGS

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(19):1372-1373. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590190034015

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Abstract

To heal the sick and to prevent disease and death are the services to society to which the physician devotes himself. Just so far as he is capable of performing these functions, he is under obligation to perform them. But the ability of medical men to cure or check disease is often limited because the nature of the disease and suitable methods of treating it are still unknown. On every side the effect of increased knowledge in giving increased power is manifest. Greater knowledge is certain to yield greater ability to restore the sick to health. Again, just so far as the physician is capable of doing so, he is as much under obligation to secure further knowledge and to diffuse it as he is under obligation to apply his skill to the individual in distress. This duty of learning is the warrant everywhere for the painstaking labors of the

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