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Article
May 15, 1915

THE CELLULOID TUBE IN FINGER INJURIES: ITS USE IN ADDING LENGTH TO THE TERMINAL PHALANX AFTER TRAUMATIC LOSS OF TISSUE

Author Affiliations

Fellow of the American College of Surgeons BALTIMORE

From the Surgical Outpatient Department, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(20):1647-1649. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570460023007
Abstract

When a partial traumatic amputation of the terminal phalanx of a finger takes place, one of two conditions is found: Either the part is cut away clean with little damage to the remaining portion, or the part is crushed off and the tissues adjacent to the amputated portion are more or less traumatized.

After the ordinary healing by granulation, we often find a sensitive stump in which the bone is covered only by a thin scar.

The question arises as to the best method of early treatment, especially when the bone is exposed.

In order to obtain a good functional result we must contrive to place a pad of tissue over the bone. This may be done rapidly and satisfactorily by shortening still more the exposed bone and closing the soft parts over it, but this method gives a shorter stump.

In certain occupations the loss of all or a

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