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Article
December 16, 1916

POLYCYTHEMIA: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A CASE WITH A HITHERTO UNDESCRIBED INCREASED RESISTANCE OF THE RED CELLS TO HEMO.LYTIC AMBOCEPTOR

Author Affiliations

SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(25):1845-1848. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590250047017
Abstract

In the reports by Lutenbacher1 and by Lucas,2 both reviewing the literature up to 1912, 196 unquestionable cases of essential polycythemia are described. Since then about fifty cases have been added. Polycythemia, polycythemia rubra (from the color of the skin), erythremia, Vaquez' disease or Osler's disease, as it is variously called, was first described by Vaquez in 1892. It shows a persistent, causeless increase of the red cells in the blood, chronic cyanosis, usually a large spleen, and the absence of cardiac, renal or other circulatory disturbance that might account for the symptoms.

Symptoms.  —Cyanosis is nearly always present. The general appearance has been strikingly described as "Indian red." The skin, especially where thin, as that of the nose, ears and about the eyes, and that of the lips and the mucosa of the mouth, is bluish or purplish. Plethora is manifested in the skin by swollen veins

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