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Article
May 22, 1915

ANALYSIS AND COST OF READY-TO-SERVE FOODS: AN INTRODUCTION BY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Physiology of the Cornell University Medical College, and Scientific Director of the Russell Sage Institute of Pathology NEW YORK

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(21):1717-1723. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570470001001
Abstract

Very early in his scientific career, in the year 1877, Atwater turned his attention to the question of the nutrition of the people. The many valuable bulletins published by the United States Department of Agriculture testify to much splendid study into the problems of food for the multitude. And yet little practical use has come of it all. Why then talk abput nutrition? A critic writes, "We need food, but do we need books to remind us of our need? And as an unanswerable challenge another critic cries, "Does Professor X eat his own diet?" It is truly stated that normal nutrition is associated with appetite, and it is therefore argued that the appetite is not to be controlled by knowledge. One has only to recall the appetite for drink to realize the utter fallacy of this argument. A glass of beer or a glass of wine taken at the

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