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Article
December 23, 1916

EXPERIMENTAL SCURVY PRODUCED IN GUINEA-PIGS BY MILK AND MILK PRODUCTS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Experimental Medicine, University of Illinois, College of Medicine; CHICAGO

From the Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, and the Pathological Laboratory of St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1916;LXVII(26):1931-1935. doi:10.1001/jama.1916.02590260047015
Abstract

Much has been written during the last few years concerning the value of the different constituents of the diet in the maintenance, growth and reproduction of animals. When animals such as white rats are fed a diet consisting of mixtures of pure proteins, carbohydrates, certain fats, and salt mixture of appropriate composition, growth fails to take place after a short time.1 Such a diet, although fulfilling all the energy and caloric requirements, is inadequate to maintain the normal growth of the rat. When such fats as butter fat,2 egg yolk fat,2 kidney fat,2 cod liver oil3 or beef fat3 are added or replace such inefficient fats as lard or olive oil, growth is stimulated. McCollum and his co-workers, and Mendel and Osborne have repeatedly demonstrated that butter fat contains something essential for growth in addition to what may be needed for maintenance. The nature

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