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Article
January 13, 1917

INNOMINATE ANEURYSM WITH RUPTURE: REPORT OF A CASE WITH TUBERCULOSIS OF ADJACENT TISSUES

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Medicine, University of California Medical School SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(2):113-116. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270010113013
Abstract

The arteries usually affected by aneurysm are, in the order of frequency of involvement, the thoracic aorta, the popliteal, the femoral-iliac, the carotid, the subclavian, the innominate and the axillary.1 Aneurysms of the innominate are in themselves sufficiently rare to warrant recording their occurrence. The case about to be described presents, however, two additional features of unusual interest: (a) tuberculous involvement of the tissues adjacent to the arterial wall; and (b) external rupture of the aneurysm. Innominate aneurysms very seldom fill with clot and heal spontaneously. More often they gradually increase in size. They seldom perforate into the trachea, pleura, mediastinum or a vein. Still more rarely do they perforate externally.2

Tuberculous disease of arteries is in itself rather a frequent lesion, vessels being affected by inoculation with bacilli carried to them from distant points, or by direct extension of the process from adjacent foci. Numerous cases have

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