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Article
June 12, 1915

DIAGNOSTIC THESES IN PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

SARANAC LAKE, N. Y.

JAMA. 1915;LXIV(24):1977. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02570500025009

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Abstract

Since the time of Hippocrates, many medical aphorisms have been published, and as they convey in a concise and at times a clear manner the experience of the writer, they are often read. Such theses must include many well-known facts to which all subscribe, and their raison d'être lies in the fact that assent or dissent is at once forthcoming. For the beginner in work in pulmonary tuberculosis, succinct opinions on diagnosis are of great assistance.

DIAGNOSTIC THESES 

  1. An appearance of ruddy health does not exclude tuberculosis.

  2. In any patient with constitutional symptoms, no matter of what he complains, the possibility of tuberculosis must be kept constantly in mind.

  3. Prolonged and intimate exposure at any time of life, but especially in childhood, and in home or workshop or office, is vastly more important in diagnosis than "unassociated" or "noncontact" heredity.

  4. Prolonged contact with tuberculosis may lead to infection, but debilitating

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