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Article
January 27, 1917

SUBACUTE AND LATENT INFANTILE SCURVY: THE CARDIORESPIRATORY SYNDROME (A NEW SIGN)

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College NEW YORK

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(4):235-239. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270010235001
Abstract

In previous papers on this subject1 it has been established, I believe, that infantile scurvy may be brought about by a diet of pasteurized milk. An investigation of this question seemed not only indicated but also urgent in view of the increasingly widespread use of pasteurized milk, and of the fact that the National Commission on Milk Standards, a committee of the highest authority, has expressed the opinion that the heating of milk, as carried out in the course of pasteurization, does not destroy its enzymes or other chemical constituents.2 As stated, my experience did not coincide with this opinion. On the contrary, I found that when the use of orange juice was discontinued in the dietary of a group of infants who were being fed on milk which had been subjected to a temperature of 140 F. for thirty minutes, some of them in the course of

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