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Article
January 27, 1917

OBSERVATIONS ON IMMUNITY OF MONKEYS TO EXPERIMENTAL POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.; BOSTON; NEW YORK

From the Mayo Foundation.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(4):280-282. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270010280012
Abstract

It is a generally accepted fact that a monkey, after recovery from an attack of experimental poliomyelitis, is immune to subsequent injection with virulent virus. It is a question whether an inoculation which does cause paralysis confers immunity. Römer believes that immunity follows unsuccessful intracerebral injection in some cases. But there are in the literature many instances in which experimental poliomyelitis has been produced in monkeys which had shown no evidence of infection from a previous inoculation.

We wish to record an experiment which appears to indicate that immunity was conferred on three monkeys by inoculations which were not followed by obvious evidence of infection. One of the apparently immune animals had previously received an intracerebral injection of a culture of pleomorphic streptococci, the second had received emulsion of central nervous system of animals paralyzed by cultures of streptococci, and the third had received virus in the usual way.

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