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Article
February 3, 1917

THE IMPORTANCE OF AURAL SYMPTOMS IN THE EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF. TUMOR OF THE CEREBELLOPONTILE ANGLE

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(5):333-336. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270020013004
Abstract

The eighth nerve, comprising the auditory and the vestibular, from a diagnostic surgical standpoint, may be divided into three portions: the peripheral, comprising the end organs in the labyrinth; the intradural, extending from the fundus of the internal auditory meatus to its entrance in the groove between the pons and the medulla, and the intracerebral ramifications of its tracts in the brain to its cortical centers in the temporosphenoidal lobe and cerebellum.

The sudden and commanding character of the symptoms in inflammation of the cochlea and semicircular canal are due largely to the small, inelastic walls of the containing bony labyrinth, compelling an immediate paralysis of the function of the delicate nerve structures; their bony case not allowing the gradual development of symptoms from slow increasing pressure on the nervous structure, which frequently occurs in nervous tissue elsewhere. (The greater resistance of the auditory portion in the labyrinth in serous

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