[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 3, 1917

THE TREATMENT OF GONORRHEAL INFECTIONSBY THE INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF KILLED GONOCOCCI, MENINGOCOCCI AND COLON BACILLI

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(5):362-366. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270020042013
Abstract

After the intravenous administration of a highly polyvalent gonococcal vaccine, Bruck and Sommer,1 in 1912-1913, observed striking therapeutic results in gonorrheal complications, especially arthritis, epididymitis and acute prostatitis. These results, within certain limits, ran parallel to the severity of the reaction following each injection. A specific temperature increase was noted which was higher in gonorrheal than in nongonorrheal patients; hence this method was suggested as a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic agent. At this time the entire process was attributed to the production of a specific immune substance, caused by the intravenous injection of the gonococcal vaccine.

It has been clearly demonstrated that, in typhoid injections, a nonspecific reaction follows the intravenous injection of colon bacilli, pyocyaneus bacilli, and secondary proteose preparations. These substances give results clinically and therapeutically quite like an injection of killed typhoid bacilli.

In order to determine the degree of specificity, if any were

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×