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Article
July 7, 1917

SODIUM SUCCINATE AND LEUKOCYTOSIS: EFFECT OF THE SUBCUTANEOUS ADMINISTRATION OF THE DRUG ON THE LEUKOCYTE CONTENT OF HUMAN BLOOD

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF C. C. BROWNING, M.D. LOS ANGELES

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(1):31. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590280033010
Abstract

The literature dealing with the physiologic functions and reactions of succinic acid or its salts is far from justifying the possible significance that may be attributed to its constant and fairly widespread occurrence in animal tissues.

The work that has been done seems to give rise to the idea that succinic acid takes an important part in the oxidations in the tissues. Batelli and Stern1 report on the relative oxidizing powers of various tissues with respect to succinic acid. Thunberg2 shows that the oxidative processes in muscle tissue are markedly influenced by the presence of this compound, and from this Mathews3 appropriately points out that the physiologic properties of succinic acid should be further investigated.

As an introduction to additional work on the subject, a study was made of the effect of the subcutaneous administration of sodium succinate on the leukocyte content of human blood from normal

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