[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.191.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 17, 1917

THE RELATION OF THE ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM OF THE BODY TO CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM: AND ITS APPLICATION IN HUMAN DIABETES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Sheffield Laboratory of Physiological Chemistry, Yale University.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(7):497-500. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270020161001
Abstract

A. THE RELATION OF THE ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM TO CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM  Under normal conditions the content of blood sugar may be regarded as one of the dody's constants. Transitory fluctuations may occur incident to ingestion of food, etc., but the variations encountered are confined within rather narrow limits. The exact mechanism controlling the constancy of the blood sugar content is unknown. It is well recognized, however, that a variety of agencies may temporarily throw out of equilibrium the blood sugar regulating mechanism producing either a state off hyperglycemia, with an accompanying glycosuria, or a condition of hypoglycemia in which sugar may or may not appear in the urine. The introduction into the organism of epinephrin may be cited as an example of the type of agents leading to the development of hyperglycemia and glycosuria. Phlorizen causes hypoglycemia with glycosuria, whereas hydrazin and phosphorus induce a diminished bloodsugar content without

×