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Article
February 24, 1917

A NEW METHOD OF ACIDOSIS THERAPY: BLOOD TRANSFUSION FROM AN ALKALINIZED DONOR, WITH REPORT OF CASE

Author Affiliations

Pathologic Chemist, Bellevue Hospital; Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College; NEW YORK

From the Department of Pathology, Bellevue and Allied Hospitals.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(8):594-598. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270020258003
Abstract

It is generally believed that the alkalinity of the blood of a normal person is fairly constant andunalterable.1 Our purpose is to show that the alkalinity of the blood of a normal person can be greatly increased by a very simple procedure, and furthermore, to point out the feasibility of such alkalinization of the blood of a normal donor to enhance its therapeutic value in blood transfusion for the treatment of acidosis.

Briefly stated, when the alkalinity of the blood is diminished through excessive acid products formed during deranged intermediary metabolism, the condition is called acidosis. The acid substances are volatile fatty acids, diacetic acid, beta-oxybutyric acid and, in all probability, occasionally lactic acid. Under normal conditions these acids are completely oxidized into carbon dioxid and water. An acid reaction of the blood is known to ue incompatible with life. Intermediary metabolism takes place only in a neutral or

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