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Article
February 24, 1917

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(8):636-641. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270020300020
Abstract

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1917 

OCCUPATIONAL DISEASES IN CHEMICAL TRADES  Almost every industrial environment furnishes certain dangers to health. These occupational hazards, usually caused by such conditions as darkness, dampness, bad ventilation, exposure to extremes of heat and cold, long hours, fatigue, or monotony of employment, are more or less common to many industries. There is an evident awakening of the public conscience in respect to the importance of the hitherto largely neglected problems which are presented by modern industrial hygiene. An international congress dealing with the subject of industrial diseases was held in Brussels in 1910 and was attended by more than 600 delegates from various quarters of the globe. Societies and commissions are being

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