[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.244.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 10, 1917

NOTE ON THE BACTERIOLOGY OF THE SPINAL FLUID IN POLIOMYELITIS AND SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

Resident Physician, Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(10):779-780. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270030111014
Abstract

During the routine examination of a patient admitted to the contagious ward of the Cook County Hospital with a diagnosis of scarlet fever, a lumbar puncture was performed because of marked rigidity of the neck. The spinal fluid was under increased pressure, the cell count was 28, principally of lymphocytes, and the globulin tests were positive. The spinal fluid was inoculated into dextrose broth and dextrose agar, and a pure culture of a small gram-positive coccus was obtained within thirty-six hours. The organism exhibited both the cultural and the morphologic characteristics of the micrococcus described by Nuzum1 as occurring in the cerebrospinal fluid in poliomyelitis. Repeated inoculations yielded pure cultures of the same micro-organism. From the nasal discharge a micrococcus was obtained resembling the organism in the spinal fluid. The organism from the nasal secretion was agglutinated by the antipoliomyelitic serum2 in a dilution of 1:500; control organisms

×