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Article
August 4, 1917

STANDARDIZATION OF SERUMS AND VACCINES: SOME DIFFICULTIES AND MISUNDERSTANDINGS

Author Affiliations

Director, Hygienic Laboratory, U. S. P. H. S. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(5):378-381. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590320054014

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Abstract

The misunderstanding that exists even among usually well informed health officers and physicians in regard to the standardization of biologic products is sufficient reason for a brief consideration of the subject. For example, under the heading "Standardization of Biological Products" on page 1416 of The Journal, May 12, 1917, a note states that the official Conference of State and Territorial Health Officers adopted a resolution recommending that the Public Health Service "establish and promulgate standards as to potency with reference to all biologic products, vaccines and serums, not only with relation to diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin, but especially with relation to antimeningococcus and pneumonia serums, and vaccines for typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and bacillary dysentery."

A standard is defined as "that which is set up and established by authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, weight, extent, value or quality; especially the original specimen weight or measure sanctioned

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