[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 11, 1917

NEPHRITIS FROM THE STANDPOINT OF UREA EXCRETION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(6):437-440. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590330021007
Abstract

That nephritis, and particularly the form commonly known as chronic interstitial nephritis, is associated with alterations in the excretion of nitrogenous waste products, especially urea, has long been known. During the past few years the introduction of simpler methods for quantitative determination of the nitrogenous constituents of the blood has led to numerous clinical studies of the condition now known as urea retention. In its proper sense this term would imply a continuous positive nitrogen balance, with a constantly increasing amount of urea in the blood and tissues. In actual use, however, the term is applied to any condition associated with an increased concentration of urea in the blood, without reference to the nitrogen balance, and the finding of a blood urea concentration higher than the average normal is called urea retention and is taken to indicate disturbed renal function.

It is my purpose to attempt to make clear what

×