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Article
August 11, 1917

INTUBATION OF THE LARYNX: AN ANALYSIS OF THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY CASES IN PRIVATE PRACTICE

Author Affiliations

Pediatrician, Conemaugh Valley Memorial Hospital and Mercy Hospital JOHNSTOWN, PA.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(6):460-463. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590330044012
Abstract

Laryngeal diphtheria, requiring intubation, has been considered by most pediatricians as a disease for hospital treatment. It is because of this belief that I decided to present an analysis of 350 cases occurring in my private practice in the hope that results obtained under the most adverse conditions may lead to more general use of this operation when hospital facilities are lacking.

Johnstown, Pa., is the center of vast steel and mining industries which attract a large population of laboring people of both native and foreign birth. The homes of many of these are overcrowded and living conditions are unhygienic, resulting in many of the children having chronic catarrhal conditions of the upper respiratory tract. There is concealment of disease through fear of quarantine, and exposure to disease through ignorance of contagion and indifference to it. These conditions made a fertile field for epidemics of laryngeal diphtheria in our community

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