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Article
August 11, 1917

FOOD POISONING, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO BOTULISM

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(6):472-474. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590330056018
Abstract

There are but few persons who have not suffered from more or less severe attacks of acute gastrointestinal disturbance which could be reasonably ascribed to something eaten shortly before. By far the most of such attacks are mild and quickly overcome, and it is only when the attack is serious and affecting many persons at the same time that it attracts particular notice, and becomes perhaps the subject of public record. In his valuable little book on food poisoning, Jordan5 points out that as cases of food poisoning are not required to be reported, we possess only imperfect information as to its occurrence, casual press reports being the only available source of information as to its prevalence. Through press-clipping bureaus and other sources, from October, 1913, to October, 1915, Jordan learned of 657 group and family outbreaks and 375 individual cases in this country. The group and family outbreaks

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