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Article
March 24, 1917

A SIMPLE OPERATING FLUOROSCOPE: FOR AID IN REMOVAL OF METAL BODIES

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Wisconsin Surgical Unit of the American Physicians Expeditions Committee, K. u. K. Reserve Hospital No. 8, Vienna, Austria (Surgeon in Chief, Dr. Joseph Rilus Eastman, Indianapolis).

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(12):908-909. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270030240009

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Abstract

Soon after we began work in Vienna, we realized that foreign bodies, such as bullets and metal fragments, were much harder to remove than one would expect, judging from the roentgenograms, various localizations, etc., and also that even those readily attainable required large, free incisions so that the tissues could be easily searched. We had the same experience which many of us have had at home with needles in the hands and feet, repeated so often, however, that we finally attempted to use the fluoroscope in conjunction with the other methods, and thus hit on this inexpensive apparatus, which is simply a light fluoroscope or cryptoscope which can be strapped to the head of the operator.

It is in the form of a hollow truncated pyramid, with a base consisting of a fluorescent screen 13 by 18 cm., the four sides of thin wood, cardboard or papier mâché, about 13

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