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Article
August 25, 1917

ROENTGENOGRAPHIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF TISSUES INVOLVED IN CHRONIC MOUTH INFECTIONS

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(8):599-603. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590350001001
Abstract

The idea that mouth infections often cause serious secondary effects has, in recent years, become definitely crystallized in the minds of physician, dentist and layman. Clinical observation has been supported by careful laboratory investigations. It is now generally recognized that a chronic suppurating focus may lead to any one of a considerable group of diseases, most of which are insidious in their development and extremely chronic in their progress. The chronic focus is therefore properly considered a menace to health, and its removal is demanded. The dental profession is thus confronted with a most serious problem, so serious that the practice of dentistry must be to a considerable extent revolutionized for its solution. The chain of causes and symptoms leading up to these mouth lesions and the peculiar physiologic relationships between the tissues involved present complex problems which have been but partially solved. There are, however, certain outstanding features, the

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