[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 7, 1917

THE CULTIVATION OF A MICROCOCCUS FROM BLOOD IN PRE-ERUPTIVE AND ERUPTIVE STAGES OF MEASLES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(14):1028-1030. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270040016008
Abstract

In 1905, Hektoen1 produced measles in two men by injecting blood collected early in the disease from measles patients. Aerobic ascites broth cultures of the injected blood remained sterile. In 1911, Anderson and Goldberger2 demonstrated that the rhesus monkey is susceptible to inoculation with the blood of measles early in the eruptive stage. Their results pointed to a "period of infectivity of the blood beginning at least before and continuing for about twenty-four hours after the first appearance of the exanthem. At the end of about twenty-four hours from the appearance of the eruption, the infectivity of the blood for the rhesus monkey already appears very greatly reduced and becomes progressively less thereafter." The blood of each patient and of the monkeys showed no growth in aerobic glucose broth cultures. Later experiments indicated that the desquamating epithelium3 of measles in itself did not carry the virus, and

×